Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Description

Product Description

Now in paperback with a new afterword.... Another pageturning New York Times bestseller by the authors of George Washington''s Secret Six and Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates.

The War of 1812 saw America threatened on every side. Encouraged by the British, Indian tribes attacked settlers in the West, while the Royal Navy terrorized the coasts. By mid-1814, President James Madison’s generals had lost control of the war in the North, losing battles in Canada. Then British troops set the White House ablaze, and a feeling of hopelessness spread across the country.

Into this dire situation stepped Major General Andrew Jackson, who feared that President Madison’s men were overlooking the most important target of all: New Orleans. If the British conquered New Orleans, they would control the mouth of the Mississippi River, cutting Americans off from that essential trade route. The new nation’s dreams of western expansion would be crushed before they really got off the ground.

Jackson had to convince President Madison and his War Department to take him seriously, even though he wasn’t one of the Virginians and New Englanders who dominated the government. He had to assemble a coalition of frontier militiamen, French-speaking Louisianans, Cherokee and Choctaw Indians, freed slaves, and even some pirates. And then he had to face the most powerful military force in the world, in the confusing terrain of the Louisiana bayous.

As they did in their previous bestsellers, Kilmeade and Yaeger make history come alive with a riveting true story that will keep you turning the pages. You’ll finish with a new understanding of one of our greatest generals and a renewed appreciation for the brave men who fought so that America could one day stretch “from sea to shining sea.”

Review

“Riveting history that reads like a stay-up-all-night thriller. Don’t miss this book!”
–Brad Thor, author of Use of Force
 
“A tale as improbable as it is spellbinding, told with deft touch and insightful clarity. Brian Kilmeade has done it again.”
–General Stanley McChrystal (U.S. Army, Retired), author of Team of Teams
 
" The scholarship is impeccable, the topic immensely important, the story masterfully crafted. This little gem of a book belongs on the bookshelf of every history buff. What a triumph!"
–Jay Winik, author of April 1865 and 1944
 
"A wild, page-turning history of one of America’s most fascinating battles.”
–Brad Meltzer, bestselling author of The President’s Shadow
 
"Brian Kilmeade, who has a gift for narrative and an intuitive feel for great stories, has written an exciting account of New Orleans and how that battle changed America down the decades."
–Jon Meacham, author of Thomas Jeffersonr, American Lion, Destiny and Power, and Franklin and Winston.
 
"A riveting introduction to one of the seminal battles in U.S. History.  The War of 1812 folk legend of Old Hickory rides high on his horse again in this engrossing overview for readers of all ages. Highly recommended!"
–Douglas Brinkley, Professor of History at Rice University and author of Rightful Heritage
 
"Kilmeade shows how the patriotism of Jackson and his generation made America great in the first place. A terrific read."
–Jane Hampton Cook, presidential historian and author of The Burning of the White House
 
“The reader gets an inkling of the grit that made America great.”
–Erik Prince, author of Civilian Warriors

About the Author

BRIAN KILMEADE and DON YAEGER are the coauthors of George Washington''s Secret Six and Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates, both New York Times bestsellers. Kilmeade cohosts Fox News Channel''s morning show Fox & Friends and hosts the daily national radio show The Brian Kilmeade Show. This is his fifth book. Yaeger has written or cowritten twenty-five books.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter 1

Freedoms at Risk

These are the times which distinguish the real friend of his country from the town-meeting brawler and the sunshine patriot. . . . The former steps forth, and proclaims his readiness to march.

-Major General Andrew Jackson

On June 1, 1812, America declared war. After a hot debate, James Madison''s war resolution was passed by a vote of 19-13 in the Senate and 79-49 in the House of Representatives, and, once again, the new nation would be taking on the world''s premier military and economic power: Great Britain.

Twenty-nine years had passed since the colonists'' improbable victory in the Revolutionary War, and for twenty-nine years the British had failed to respect American sovereignty. Now, the nation James Madison led had reached the limit of its tolerance. Great Britain''s kidnapping of American sailors and stirring up of Indian tribes to attack settlers on the western frontier had made life intolerably difficult for many of America''s second generation, including those hardscrabble men and women pushing the boundaries westward.

Though reluctant to risk the new nation''s liberty, Madison was now ready to send a message to England and the world that America would stand up to the bully that chose to do her harm. The unanswered question was: Could America win? Less than thirty years removed from the last war, and with virtually no national army, were Americans prepared to take on Britain and defend themselves, this time without the help of France? The world was about to find out.

In fact, so many Americans opposed the war that the declaration posed a real risk to the country''s national unity. The Federalist Party, mainly representing northerners whose economy relied on British trade, had unanimously opposed the war declaration. Many New Englanders wanted peace with Britain, and it was likely that some would even be willing to leave the Union in order to avoid a fight.

Yet peaceful attempts at resolving the conflict with Britain had already been tried-and hadn''t helped the economy much. Five years earlier, when a British ship attacked the U.S. Navy''s Chesapeake, killing three sailors and taking four others from the ship to impress them into service to the Crown, then president Thomas Jefferson had attempted to retaliate. To protest this blatant hostility, Congress passed the Embargo Act, prohibiting overseas trade with Great Britain. Unfortunately, the act hurt Americans more than the British. In just fifteen months, the embargo produced a depression that cruelly punished merchants and farmers while doing little to deter the Royal Navy''s interference and hardening New England''s resistance to conflict. Further attempts at legislative pressure in the early years of James Madison''s presidency had little effect, and British impressment had continued. By the time of the war declaration in June 1812, the number of sailors seized off the decks of American ships had risen to more than five thousand men.

To many, including Andrew Jackson, then forty years old, the attack on the Chesapeake alone had been an insult to American pride that demanded a military response. As Jackson wrote to a Virginia friend after learning of the Chesapeake''s fate, "The degradation offered to our government . . . has roused every feeling of the American heart, and war with that nation is inevitable."

Yet America had waited, and the losses at sea mounted. At the same time, attempts to pacify the British had only resulted in further losses in America''s new territory, "the West," which ran south to north from the Gulf of Mexico to Canada, bounded on the west by the Mississippi. There British agents were said to be agitating the Indians. For many years, the Five Civilized Tribes in the region (Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole) had maintained peaceful relations with the European arrivals. But as more and more white settlers moved into native territories, tensions had risen and open conflict had broken out. In some places, travelers could no longer be certain whether the Native Americans they encountered were friendly; for inhabitants of the frontier, that meant the events of daily life were accompanied by fear. Stories circulated of fathers who returned from a day of hunting to find their children butchered, and of wives who stumbled upon their husbands scalped in the fields.

A major Shawnee uprising in the Indiana Territory in 1811 escalated the fear. And as the bloodshed increased, there were reports that the British were providing the Indians with weapons and promising them land if they carried out violent raids against American settlers. For Andrew Jackson, the threat had become too close for comfort when, in the spring of 1812, just a hundred miles from his home, a marauding band of Creeks killed six settlers and took a woman hostage. Jackson was certain the British were behind the attack on the little settlement at the mouth of the Duck River.

Westerners like Jackson fumed at the government''s inability to resolve the country''s problems, but their clout in Washington was limited. The decision makers from Virginia and New England had little sympathy for their inland countrymen. Eastern newspapers poked fun at the hill folks'' backward ways, and much of the territory west of the Appalachian Mountains remained mysterious and wild, with few good roads and even fewer maps. The dangers faced by westerners were not felt by easterners, and their anguished demands for retaliation were scorned and dismissed by those whose wallets would be hurt by the war.

But eventually, despite many politicians'' disdain for their hick neighbors to the west, Washington politics had begun to shift along with the nation''s growing population. The West had gained new influence in the elections of 1810 and 1811, when the region sent a spirited band of new representatives to the Capitol. These men saw British attitudes toward the United States as a threat to American liberty and independence; they also saw the need for westward expansion, a move that the British were trying to thwart. Led by a young Kentuckian named Henry Clay, they quickly gained the nickname War Hawks, because, despite the risks, they knew it was time to fight.

Clay became Speaker of the House and he, along with the War Hawks and like-minded Republicans from the coastal states, put pressure on the Madison administration. Now, after years of resistance, Madison listened, and with Congress''s vote, the War of 1812 began. America decided to stand up for its sovereignty on the sea and its security in the West.

The War Hawks in Washington were ecstatic about the declaration of war, and so was Jackson in Tennessee. At last he would have the chance to defend the nation he loved, to protect his family and friends-and, personally, to take revenge on the nation that had left him alone and scarred so many years before.

The Boy Becomes a Man

A quarter century before, Jackson had swallowed his grudge. When the Treaty of Paris made U.S. independence official in 1783, the orphaned sixteen-year-old adopted America as his family.

Relatives had taken him in after his mother''s death. He became a saddler''s apprentice, then, his ambitions rising, he clerked for a North Carolina attorney. Andrew Jackson''s cobbled-together upbringing would serve him well, though he also gained a reputation as a young man who loved drinking, playing cards, and horse racing.

Admitted to the bar to practice law at age twenty, a year later he accepted an appointment as a public prosecutor in North Carolina''s western district. That took him beyond the boundaries of the state, to the other side of the Appalachians. Jackson arrived in a region that, a few years after his arrival, became the state of Tennessee.

The red-haired, blue-eyed, and rangy six-foot-one young man made an immediate impression in Nashville, a frontier outpost established just eight years earlier. As Jackson put down roots, he became one of its chief citizens as his and his city''s reputations grew. His rise gained momentum after he met Rachel Donelson, the youngest daughter of one of Nashville''s founding families. Dark-eyed Rachel was the prettiest of the Donelson sisters and full of life. It was said she was "the best story-teller, the best dancer, . . . [and] the most dashing horsewoman in the western country." Jackson was smitten, and after she extricated herself from a marriage already gone bad, he took her as his wife.

As a lawyer, a trader, and a merchant, Jackson bought and sold land. By the time Tennessee joined the Union, in 1796, he had won the respect of his neighbors, who chose him as their delegate to the state''s constitutional convention. Jackson then served as Tennessee''s first congressman for one session before becoming a U.S. senator. But he found life in the political realm of the Federal City frustrating-too little got done for the decisive young Jackson-and he accepted an appointment to Tennessee''s Supreme Court. In the early years of the nineteenth century, he divided his energies between administering the law and establishing himself at his growing plantation, the Hermitage, ten miles outside Nashville. "His house was the seat of hospitality," wrote a young officer friend, "the resort of friends and acquaintances, and of all strangers visiting the state."

His next venture into public service would suit him better: thanks to his strong relationships and sound political instincts, he was elected major general of the Tennessee militia, in February 1802. Maintained by the state, not the federal government, the militia was provisioned by local men who supplied their own weapons and uniforms and served short contracts of a few months'' duration. Leading the militia was a good fit for Jackson''s style, because it gave him the chance to serve the people he loved with the freedom he needed and the challenge he craved.

General Jackson repeatedly won reelection as well as the deep loyalty of his men. They liked what he said. He was often outspoken, and many shared his uncompromising views on defending settlers'' rights. With rumors of war, he was ready to defend his people and was just the man to rally westerners to the cause of American liberty. "Citizens!" he wrote in a broadside. "Your government has at last yielded to the impulse of a nation. . . . Are we the titled slaves of George the Third? The military conscripts of Napoleon the great? Or the frozen peasants of the Russian czar? No-we are the free-born sons of America; the citizens of the only republic now existing in the world."

Jackson understood the stakes of the war, and he recognized the strategy as only a westerner could. Of critical importance to victory in the West was a port city near the Gulf Coast. As Jackson would soon say to his troops, in the autumn of 1812, "Every man of the western country turns his eyes intuitively upon the mouth of the Mississippi." Together, he observed, "[we are] committed by nature herself [to] the defense of the lower Mississippi and the city of New Orleans."

The City of New Orleans

New Orleans was important-so important, in fact, that upon becoming president a dozen years earlier, Thomas Jefferson had made acquiring it a key objective. Recognizing the city''s singular strategic importance to his young nation, he wrote, "There is on the globe one single spot, the possessor of which is our natural and habitual enemy. It is New Orleans."

Knowing that Napoleon''s plan for extending his American empire had suffered a major setback in the Caribbean, where his expeditionary force had been decimated by yellow fever, Jefferson sensed an opportunity. He dispatched his friend James Monroe to Paris, instructing him to try to purchase New Orleans.

Monroe had succeeded in his assignment beyond Jefferson''s wildest dreams. Recognizing his resources were already overextended in his quest to dominate Europe, Napoleon agreed to sell all of Louisiana. That conveyed an immense wilderness to the United States, effectively doubling the size of the new country. The Louisiana Purchase had been completed in 1803 and, at a purchase price of $15 million for more than eight hundred thousand square miles of territory, the land had been a staggering bargain (the cost to America''s treasury worked out to less than three cents an acre).

The Louisiana city of New Orleans was the great gateway to and from the heart of the country. America''s inland waterways-the Ohio, the Missouri, and the numerous other rivers that emptied into the Mississippi-amounted to an economic lifeline for farmers, trappers, and lumbermen upstream. On these waters flatboats and keelboats were a common sight, carrying manufactured goods from Pennsylvania, as well as crops, pelts, and logs from the burgeoning farms and lush forests across the Ohio Valley, Cumberland Gap, and Great Smoky Mountains. On reaching the wharves, warehouses, and quays of New Orleans, the goods went aboard waiting ships to be transported all over the world.

Although Louisiana became a state in April 1812, the British still questioned the legitimacy of America''s ownership of the Louisiana Territory-Napoleon had taken Louisiana from Spain and, to some Europeans, it remained rightfully a possession of the Spanish Crown. Jackson feared that sort of thinking could provide the British with just the pretext they needed to interfere with the American experiment-capturing New Orleans would be the perfect way to disrupt America''s western expansion.

Now that America had finally gone to war, many nagging practical questions hung in the air in Washington. Who would determine America''s military strategy? Who would lead the nation to war? The generals of the revolutionary generation were aging or dead. The passing of George Washington had sent the nation into mourning thirteen years before, and no military leader had the stature to take the general''s place. Although the country had prevailed in the previous decade in a war on the Barbary Coast of North Africa, defeating pirate states that had attacked its shipping and held its men hostage, this was a bigger fight for even bigger stakes.

Although neither Mr. Madison nor the members of Congress could know it in June 1812, the burden of protecting the West would eventually settle onto the narrow but resilient shoulders of General Andrew Jackson, a man little known and less liked outside his region. But first Jackson had to convince the men in Washington that a general from the backwoods was the one to lead the fight. That would be anything but easy.

Chapter 2

How to Lose a War

Resolved, that we consider the war commenced against Great Britain under existing circumstances unnecessary, impolitic and ruinous.

- Citizens of Lincoln County, Maine, August 3, 1812

The Boston Evening Post soon dubbed the conflict "Mr. Madison''s War." With no template to follow-he was the first American president ever to sign a formal declaration of war-James Madison was largely on his own.

There was nothing battle-hardened about Madison. Soft-spoken as well as short, he weighed perhaps 120 pounds. Genteel in manner, he was sickly and bookish, with a face that bore the age lines of a man of sixty-one years. He was a far cry from the strategist George Washington had been and had little choice when it came to military matters but to rely on the advice of his counselors. Many of them also lacked war experience.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.8 out of 54.8 out of 5
3,114 global ratings

Reviews with images

Top reviews from the United States

Mark Macbeth
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Read this book!
Reviewed in the United States on July 17, 2018
This is among the top five history books I have ever read, and I like to read history. It has ample background to the battle without killing the reader with WAY too much information like so many history books. It almost read like an action novel. In fact, by the time I... See more
This is among the top five history books I have ever read, and I like to read history. It has ample background to the battle without killing the reader with WAY too much information like so many history books. It almost read like an action novel. In fact, by the time I got to the battle I couldn''t put it down! Like most Americans all I knew about the Battle of New Orleans was the old Johnny Horton song where the British ran off after being fired on a couple of times. I never had thought about the fact that the British soldiers were the survivors and victors over the Republican Army of Napoleon. They had beaten the best army in the world! In Louisiana they were facing a ragtag mix of frontiersmen, riverboat men, dock workers, prisoners, and even pirates. There is only one reason they were not demolished by the Brits--Andrew Jackson. Since I learned about the Trail of Tears I have never liked the man. He was a man of his times and had many flaws. After reading this book my opinion has changed completely. I still don''t really like him, but I don''t think there is a man on this earth that could have accomplished what he did in preparation and execution of this final chapter in the war. He was sick, had old wounds that troubled him, was hampered by lack of funding and had almost no trained soldiers to rely on. He accomplished the impossible, and with that he has my undying admiration and respect. He truly earned his nickname "Old Hickory." He was perhaps the best natural military leader in the history of this nation.
69 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
S
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Opened My Eyes to the War of 1812 - Who Knew?
Reviewed in the United States on January 11, 2018
I enjoyed learning about this era in American history. I didn''t realize the union was so weak after the American Revolution that we nearly lost our country back to the British. I finally understand the War of 1812. It was fun to learn how our national anthem fit into... See more
I enjoyed learning about this era in American history. I didn''t realize the union was so weak after the American Revolution that we nearly lost our country back to the British. I finally understand the War of 1812. It was fun to learn how our national anthem fit into this story. I also learned what a wonderful man Andrew Jackson was - a true hero! I really appreciate how the New Orleans women''s prayer vigil during the Battle of New Orleans is given credit for the miraculous victory. What a great American story!
32 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
L'Omar's Mom
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The REAL Andrew Jackson!
Reviewed in the United States on February 21, 2018
Having received most of my "education" about the War of 1812 back in high school on ONE day, and from Johnny Horton''s song, "....in 1814 we took a little trip...and fought the bloody British in the town of New Orleans..." A humorous little ditty - lots of... See more
Having received most of my "education" about the War of 1812 back in high school on ONE day, and from Johnny Horton''s song, "....in 1814 we took a little trip...and fought the bloody British in the town of New Orleans..." A humorous little ditty - lots of fun, but not really a great place to get a realistic look at that time in our history. Anyway, as I said, having received my education thusly, I was totally enthralled by this very griltty recounting of Jackson and his amazing victory over not only the British, but forces in the U.S. arrayed against him, his own fragile health, and the topography of New Orleans itself. This is not to be missed!
27 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Robert James Vandevoort (Show Low, Arizona)
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Exciting Piece of American History
Reviewed in the United States on November 5, 2018
While this reader’s knowledge of the War of 1812 was limited to some battles in the Northeast and the burning of Washington D.C., by the British, and knew that Andrew Jackson was involved in some battle that saved New Orleans, he did not know any of the details. That has... See more
While this reader’s knowledge of the War of 1812 was limited to some battles in the Northeast and the burning of Washington D.C., by the British, and knew that Andrew Jackson was involved in some battle that saved New Orleans, he did not know any of the details. That has now been resolved following the reading of Brian Kilmeade’s and Don Yaeger’s 2017 “Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans”. Once again, these two authors have signaled out an important segment of American history.

This story will allow one to see Andrew Jackson in a new light, perhaps in a more important role than when he was elected the 7th president of the United States. While serving as a Major General in the army of the United States, he built a plan of battle using a ragtag army of different backgrounds to go up to a well-trained British army in excess of 10,000 soldiers. He won the battle having killed nearly 3,000 British soldiers, while only loosing a handful of Americans.

It was nice to see a European-like city, New Orleans, with only a small number of English speakers, become an American city with patriotism for their new country, as a result of the battle just outside the city. If the battle of New Orleans ended as a British victory, it is hard to envision the westward expansion that soon follow as well as the country the United States is today, because the British would have controlled the south and Spain controlling Florida.

When the next long-distance road-trip is planned for a trip going east, a stop must be made in Nashville to pay respects to the late president and military officer at Hermitage, Jackson’s former estate where he is also buried. And now, when I think about the $20 bill carrying his photograph, that photo must remain, because America owes this hero the respect!
15 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Robert L. Bartz
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I really enjoyed this book
Reviewed in the United States on January 31, 2018
I really enjoyed this book. It acquainted me with what was really happening in our country during this early period in U.S. history. It shows that Andrew Jackson was a lot more than the boisterous country bumpkin of his general reputation. The detailed progress... See more
I really enjoyed this book. It acquainted me with what was really happening in our country during this early period in U.S. history.
It shows that Andrew Jackson was a lot more than the boisterous country bumpkin of his general reputation. The detailed progress
outlined of the battle of New Orleans is riveting. This book has sparked me into getting the 3 volume history of Andrew Jackson by Remini.
I need to know a lot more about this man who probably, as pointed out in the book, saved the U.S. and allowed it to become the large continent covering country it is today.
17 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
12-string fingerpicker
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
SHOWS YET AGAIN WHAT A DEDICATED INDIVIDUAL CAN MEAN TO HISTORY!
Reviewed in the United States on October 19, 2020
I got this as part of a gift collection of books on the Brilliant History or our US Marine Corps, for our Grandson, who just completed USMC Basic Training, to express our Pride and Gratitude to this young man. Geared for general readership of various ages, yet... See more
I got this as part of a gift collection of books on the Brilliant History or our US Marine Corps, for our Grandson, who just completed USMC Basic Training, to express our Pride and Gratitude to this young man.

Geared for general readership of various ages, yet full of tidbits (ex. US Marines) previously unknown to me. Andrew Jackson was the 2nd great man to create and save America, as was George Washington. So many of our Founding Fathers gave ALL to the creation of our Bastion of Freedom, including their fortunes. Such a sorrowful contrast to the persons who emerge from "Public Service" in recent times, Much Richer than when the went in!

The author shows how we can work, & even Fight as One, despite our differences, to confront & even DEFEAT the greatest Military Power(S) on Earth.

OPEN YOUR HEARTS AND MINDS TO APPRECIATE WHAT AND JUST WHO WE ARE AS AMERICANS!

Love, my Brothers, Sisters, Fathers, Mothers...
5 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
R. P. Lenk
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This is a book for young readers
Reviewed in the United States on June 11, 2020
This book is good for those who need an entertaining overview of Old Hickory and Davey Crockett uncluttered by details. It moves along briskly and it presents the world through the prism of the Hallmark Channel. The heroes are heroes and the red sticks and the British are... See more
This book is good for those who need an entertaining overview of Old Hickory and Davey Crockett uncluttered by details. It moves along briskly and it presents the world through the prism of the Hallmark Channel. The heroes are heroes and the red sticks and the British are the bad guys.
I was expecting an adult book, with a little historical research that offered some novel insight, such as you might find in a Nathaniel Philbrick history.
It''s fine for what it is, but it should be labelled as a book for young readers.
7 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Dr.Stanley Toompas
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This Jackson book: Easily worth a hard-earned "Jackson"
Reviewed in the United States on January 16, 2018
Along with Brian Kilmeade''s other books "George Washington''s Secret Six" and "Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates", another outstanding, condensed, yet thorough work on an interesting piece of American history. A great companion book to HW Brands, "... See more
Along with Brian Kilmeade''s other books "George Washington''s Secret Six" and "Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates", another outstanding, condensed, yet thorough work on an interesting piece of American history. A great companion book to HW Brands, " Andrew Jackson, His Life and Times."
Along with Oreilly''s "Killing" series, I anxiously await the arrival of his next book!

Dr. Stanley E. Toompas, Optometrist
& Arthur of, "I''m the One the Other Isn''t"
12 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

Mr Q Appy
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Thought carefully before writing this review...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 8, 2018
Well, if i get thrown out of Britain so be it... This is an excellent book about a remarkable military leader of the 1812 Anglo-American war. "Old Hickory" might well be compared to William Wallace, the Scottish legend, for defeating much larger invading English forces who...See more
Well, if i get thrown out of Britain so be it... This is an excellent book about a remarkable military leader of the 1812 Anglo-American war. "Old Hickory" might well be compared to William Wallace, the Scottish legend, for defeating much larger invading English forces who appeared to have every advantage over his own including the element of surprise to an extent. Using innovation and with no formal military education he was a natural strategist and leader of men, who really did send the Red Coats packing! This work really brings the character of the man and his times to life in technicolour. Great research and complete with opinions of the General by future U.S Presidents. Read it in one sitting without any effort, great historical work! If you like history brought to life you''ll probably like this book.
Well, if i get thrown out of Britain so be it... This is an excellent book about a remarkable military leader of the 1812 Anglo-American war. "Old Hickory" might well be compared to William Wallace, the Scottish legend, for defeating much larger invading English forces who appeared to have every advantage over his own including the element of surprise to an extent.
Using innovation and with no formal military education he was a natural strategist and leader of men, who really did send the Red Coats packing!
This work really brings the character of the man and his times to life in technicolour. Great research and complete with opinions of the General by future U.S Presidents. Read it in one sitting without any effort, great historical work! If you like history brought to life you''ll probably like this book.
Report
irishpropheticart
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Another excellent book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 21, 2018
Very easy to read.I read it in half a day,that well written.
Very easy to read.I read it in half a day,that well written.
Report
William Parker
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wish it had been longer!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 2, 2018
Reading this kind of felt like reading adventure stories when I was young. Long time since I felt so excited reading a history book. Good work Brian Kilmeade
Reading this kind of felt like reading adventure stories when I was young. Long time since I felt so excited reading a history book. Good work Brian Kilmeade
Report
Translate all reviews to English
Alexandre Berner
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
fascinating reading, good resarched considering battles but shallowly researched and one sided considered the political Hintergr
Reviewed in Germany on January 21, 2018
I do not entirely share the reasons while some give the books 5 stars and only can give it 3 stars. The book is very well written and fascinates from the beginning, an easy read and probably also good researched converning the battles etc. But in my opinion it is not a...See more
I do not entirely share the reasons while some give the books 5 stars and only can give it 3 stars. The book is very well written and fascinates from the beginning, an easy read and probably also good researched converning the battles etc. But in my opinion it is not a neutral compte rendu of the battle between the Indians who were allied to the British. It does not give the real reason why the Indians allied with the Britains to fight against the US. Of course it relates that the Indian way of warring aand maybe also the British way of warrling was very dirty. But it does not relate why the Indians had to fight as they did. From the beginning of the settlement by the brithish colonies the indians had been cheated by the native Americans, who traded and exchanged there much sought after rifles and blankets and alas also rhum to very bad conditions against Indians who were not accustomed to European trading methods and soon lost the land they needed to survive with their extensive farming.. That''s why beginning less than fifty years after the event of the Mayflower landing and before the independency war there were two uprisings against the settlers during the Indian-American war there were two uprisings against the settlers and the british forces the "King Philip war" and ten years later the "Pontiac War" and the Indians allied with the French against the Briish. Admittedly indian war tactics were somewhat crude and affected also the wives and children of the settlers but that was the native indian war culture. But it lead to severe uproars among the settlers against the british colonial force and King George III so much hated by the US-citizens as you report, made a treaty between the indian tribes granting them the land were thise colonies of Tennessee etc lay as their territories. This treaty was soon breached by the settlers and the land of the Indians again treded as much to low prices so that the Indian made war raids and the Briish colonials forces treid to force the settlers in the colonies to adhere to the treaty. This, among other reasons like the rule to use only some ports and english ships to import the sugar to produce the rhum and a rule that allowed the distillers to import only brithis sugar and british goods, was considered by the settlers as an affront and led to the War of Independence and right from the beginning of this war it was clear, that the southern states like Virginia had other ethic rules than the northern states which finally led to the Civil war. I find that all these reasons are not at all described in this history which I thought was written by a serious historians who should treat fairly both sides of the war. Another point which I do not find serious is that wrong historical facts are stated. New Orleans was called "La Nouvelle Orléan" by de la Moyne not after "a French King Phillip II" but after the duke of Oeleans Philippe II. There is no French king called Phillippe II, in fact Phillipe II was a nephew of king Louis XIV. These are the reasons while I can give only three stars to this in fact very good written book. I began reading this book because I wanted to be better informed about President Jackson whom the present quite boisterous president Trump considers to be his model president and I wanted to know if really he lived up to the standard of this controversial,president with either good and bad traits and I find out that he does not match his model president, not having made a carrier from orphan to millionaire and president and not having showed any tactical genius like his predecessor. Like for example President Barack Obama which he devilishes in all aspects really showed towards his "model president" Abhraham Lincoln. Jackson had many bad sides like his short temper, and his publicising politics. On this latter aspect he followed Jefferson but as a tactician an military he certainly was a dignified follower of president Washington and certainly also the first good military tactician after president Washington who in the beginning being a native Officer in the british colonial forces had also to learn a löt about disciplining his men and diplomacy. The diplomacy of General and later President Jackson was also rather not so good and his followers like van Buren got worse.and let America slidder into Civil War. I suppose that when the book speaks about President Adams it means President Quincy Adams which is also the same not so good description as was with King Philipp II. Over all, for the reasons cited, I am not much satisfied with the book and hesitated between giving two stars or three stars, giving the thress stars because it is so fascinateingly good written and spoken. I think I will have to read the biography of president Jackson to get a better image of the President, first considered one of the best, later on in the sixties, seventies, considered a poor president..
I do not entirely share the reasons while some give the books 5 stars and only can give it 3 stars. The book is very well written and fascinates from the beginning, an easy read and probably also good researched converning the battles etc. But in my opinion it is not a neutral compte rendu of the battle between the Indians who were allied to the British. It does not give the real reason why the Indians allied with the Britains to fight against the US. Of course it relates that the Indian way of warring aand maybe also the British way of warrling was very dirty. But it does not relate why the Indians had to fight as they did. From the beginning of the settlement by the brithish colonies the indians had been cheated by the native Americans, who traded and exchanged there much sought after rifles and blankets and alas also rhum to very bad conditions against Indians who were not accustomed to European trading methods and soon lost the land they needed to survive with their extensive farming.. That''s why beginning less than fifty years after the event of the Mayflower landing and before the independency war there were two uprisings against the settlers during the Indian-American war there were two uprisings against the settlers and the british forces the "King Philip war" and ten years later the "Pontiac War" and the Indians allied with the French against the Briish. Admittedly indian war tactics were somewhat crude and affected also the wives and children of the settlers but that was the native indian war culture. But it lead to severe uproars among the settlers against the british colonial force and King George III so much hated by the US-citizens as you report, made a treaty between the indian tribes granting them the land were thise colonies of Tennessee etc lay as their territories. This treaty was soon breached by the settlers and the land of the Indians again treded as much to low prices so that the Indian made war raids and the Briish colonials forces treid to force the settlers in the colonies to adhere to the treaty. This, among other reasons like the rule to use only some ports and english ships to import the sugar to produce the rhum and a rule that allowed the distillers to import only brithis sugar and british goods, was considered by the settlers as an affront and led to the War of Independence and right from the beginning of this war it was clear, that the southern states like Virginia had other ethic rules than the northern states which finally led to the Civil war. I find that all these reasons are not at all described in this history which I thought was written by a serious historians who should treat fairly both sides of the war. Another point which I do not find serious is that wrong historical facts are stated. New Orleans was called "La Nouvelle Orléan" by de la Moyne not after "a French King Phillip II" but after the duke of Oeleans Philippe II. There is no French king called Phillippe II, in fact Phillipe II was a nephew of king Louis XIV. These are the reasons while I can give only three stars to this in fact very good written book. I began reading this book because I wanted to be better informed about President Jackson whom the present quite boisterous president Trump considers to be his model president and I wanted to know if really he lived up to the standard of this controversial,president with either good and bad traits and I find out that he does not match his model president, not having made a carrier from orphan to millionaire and president and not having showed any tactical genius like his predecessor. Like for example President Barack Obama which he devilishes in all aspects really showed towards his "model president" Abhraham Lincoln. Jackson had many bad sides like his short temper, and his publicising politics. On this latter aspect he followed Jefferson but as a tactician an military he certainly was a dignified follower of president Washington and certainly also the first good military tactician after president Washington who in the beginning being a native Officer in the british colonial forces had also to learn a löt about disciplining his men and diplomacy. The diplomacy of General and later President Jackson was also rather not so good and his followers like van Buren got worse.and let America slidder into Civil War. I suppose that when the book speaks about President Adams it means President Quincy Adams which is also the same not so good description as was with King Philipp II. Over all, for the reasons cited, I am not much satisfied with the book and hesitated between giving two stars or three stars, giving the thress stars because it is so fascinateingly good written and spoken. I think I will have to read the biography of president Jackson to get a better image of the President, first considered one of the best, later on in the sixties, seventies, considered a poor president..
Report
Translate review to English
EM
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Well written
Reviewed in Canada on October 17, 2019
Beautiful
Beautiful
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

More items to explore

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The wholesale Battle That popular Shaped America's Destiny online sale