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Citizen Vince: outlet online sale A wholesale Novel outlet online sale

Citizen Vince: outlet online sale A wholesale Novel outlet online sale

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One day you know more dead people that live ones...

Jess Walter is a writer with a rare talent for finding humanity and emotional truths in lives lived on both sides of the law. With his third novel, Citizen Vince, Walter has crafted a story as inventive as it is suspenseful -- an irresistible tale about the price of freedom and the mystery of salvation.

It''s the fall of 1980, eight days before a presidential election that pits the downtrodden Jimmy Carter against the suspiciously sunny Ronald Reagan ("Are you better off than you were four years ago?"). In a quiet house in Spokane, Washington, Vince Camden wakes up at 1:59 a.m., pockets his weekly stash of stolen credit cards, and drops in on an all-night poker game with his low-life friends on his way to his witness-protection job dusting crullers at Donut Make You Hungry. This is the sum of Vince''s new life: donuts, forged credit cards, marijuana smuggled in jars of volcanic ash, and a neurotic hooker girlfriend who dreams of being a real estate agent.

But when a familiar face shows up in town, Vince realizes that no matter how far you think you''ve run from your past . . . it''s always close behind you. Over the course of the next unforgettable week, on the run from Spokane to New York''s Lower East Side, Vince Camden will negotiate a maze of obsessive cops, eager politicians, and emerging mobsters, only to find that redemption might just exist in -- of all places -- a voting booth.

Darkly funny and surprisingly hopeful, Citizen Vince is the story of a charming crook chasing the biggest score of his life: a second chance.

From Bookmarks Magazine

Jess Walter, who steps back in history for his third novel, brings back an "utterly inventive" tale of crime and politics ( Washington Post). Walter, whose previous books include Land of the Blind and a non-fiction account of the Ruby Ridge massacre, Every Knee Shall Bow, seems to have found his stride as a novelist. Critics praise the author’s ability to straddle—or shatter—the conceits of the mystery novel, while offering a sincere, at times hilarious, rumination on the challenges of citizenship and the price of freedom. Except for the Seattle Times’s vote against the stream of consciousness chapters that delve into Reagan and Carter’s minds, the pundits all agree: Citizen Vince is the real deal.

Copyright © 2004 Phillips & Nelson Media, Inc.

From Booklist

It''s October 1980, and laid-back loner Vince Camden never misses a morning making maple bars at the doughnut shop he manages in Spokane, Washington. And he rarely misses a night relieving locals of their bankrolls at an after-hours poker game, selling his hooker pals pot at cost, and running a lucrative credit-card theft ring. Vince has landed in eastern Washington via the witness-protection plan, and he is starting to like the simple pleasures, including receiving his first voter-registration card. So even when a hit man, a local cop, and Mob-boss-in-waiting John Gotti get Vince in their crosshairs, he keeps trying to figure out if he should pull the lever for Reagan or Carter. This tale of unlikely redemption works because of Walter''s virtuoso command of character and dialogue--along with a wicked second-act twist. The novel is also a gritty love letter to Spokane and all the other second-tier cities where residents don''t realize how good they''ve got it, and with its Capara-like spirit, it serves as a surprisingly satisfying antidote to the avalanche of cynical chatter emanating from this year''s political campaigns and commentators. Frank Sennett
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

“(An) immensely entertaining crime thriller and wry social commentary.” (Chicago Tribune)

“Rich in robust characters ad wry dialogue, with agile prose, a big heart and a finely tuned plot.” (Seattle Times)

“A splendidly entertaining, thoughtful book ... Jess Walter continues to impress.” (Sunday Telegraph)

“What makes Walter’s third novel so enjoyable is Vince, a flawed but sympathetic character trying to find redemption.” (Library Journal)

1st Place, General Trade-Jacket, New York Book Show (No Source)

About the Author

Jess Walter is the author of six novels, including the bestsellers Beautiful Ruins and The Financial Lives of the Poets, the National Book Award finalist The Zero, and Citizen Vince, the winner of the Edgar Award for best novel. His short fiction has appeared in Harper''s, McSweeney''s, and Playboy, as well as The Best American Short Stories and The Best American Nonrequired Reading. He lives in his hometown of Spokane, Washington.

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4.4 out of 54.4 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

CCS, in Maryland
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This is currently - far and away - my favorite comic novel
Reviewed in the United States on March 26, 2017
This is currently - far and away - my favorite comic novel. I disagree with a previous reviewer that it is not of the same caliber as Walter''s BEAUTIFUL RUINS. BEAUTIFUL RUINS is, certainly, incredibly funny: especially for those of us who are Italians or Italian... See more
This is currently - far and away - my favorite comic novel. I disagree with a previous reviewer that it is not of the same caliber as Walter''s BEAUTIFUL RUINS. BEAUTIFUL RUINS is, certainly, incredibly funny: especially for those of us who are Italians or Italian Americans. But CITIZEN VINCE is also a perfectly executed novel in a different genre; I''d love to teach it in Detective Fiction, were I still teaching. I cannot imagine how anyone remains unengaged by Walter''s central character or his writing in CITIZEN VINCE. Did Jess Walter grow up in New York? He does it so well. Then again, he does Italy so well, too. I recommend his fiction; I''ve read most of it. I''m reading his nonfiction now.
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Ihaveopinions
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Walter gets my vote.
Reviewed in the United States on May 28, 2019
Who is this guy Walter? Damn, he writes really clever, engaging, and intricate novels with an array of interesting characters. Citzen Vince leaps to the top of my list of great "crime" novels, but it''s so much more than that. It''s one of my favorite novels of the past year.... See more
Who is this guy Walter? Damn, he writes really clever, engaging, and intricate novels with an array of interesting characters. Citzen Vince leaps to the top of my list of great "crime" novels, but it''s so much more than that. It''s one of my favorite novels of the past year. Walter is enormously talented and blessed with astonishing range. This is one book that will not disappoint.
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aPriL does feral sometimes
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of my top ten reads this year
Reviewed in the United States on August 3, 2014
"A great nation is like a great man..... He thinks of his enemy as the shadow That he himself casts." ---Tao Te Ching This inscription provides a clue to the main theme of ''Citizen Vince''. As the quote is on the first page of the... See more
"A great nation is like a great man.....
He thinks of his enemy as the shadow
That he himself casts."

---Tao Te Ching

This inscription provides a clue to the main theme of ''Citizen Vince''. As the quote is on the first page of the book, I paid particular attention to the 1980 Presidential contest between Jimmie Carter and Ronald Reagan which fascinates Vince Camden, the thief who is our ''hero''. Having been convicted of a felony as a younger man than he is now, which is currently age 36, he lost the right to vote a decade ago. In other words, he no longer had a voice in choosing the direction of the body of the nation. Losing the right of having a choice devastated Vince, but not so that he noticed. Instead, it was like a backburner fire eating at his heart. It manifested instead in an underlying depression, as well as a shocked horror in discovering that Charles Dickens, the famous English author, had written two endings to the book, ''Great Expectations''. This was such an unpleasant fact of history to him, Vince could no longer finish any book he started reading. Instead, his literary explorations were only a continuous series of beginnings with no endings, stuck, repeating himself, never pushing through to the conclusion. He had lost his great expectations.

Instead he felt a strong compulsion to follow the Presidential election. Jimmie Carter was trying to keep the job, but unfortunately he did not seem to be attractive to the voters. He was a man of decency and honesty, beyond corruption, self-sacrificing. A religious man, Carter tried to live and lead as he believed Jesus would have approved, using round-table discussions to find solutions, including all combatants and interests in order to work out a mutual agreement. The people turned away from Carter and adored Ronald Reagan. Reagan represented a return to values of the past, a tougher and meaner America. Instead of the inclusive policies of Carter which promised the equality of compromise, the people were choosing exclusivity, Us against Them, ruling through divisiveness and the power to take what one wants through whoever is strongest. Reagan promised to build up the military in order to resolve issues around the world and in our country through force and violence, using unilateral self-serving and imposed solutions, promising to save face first, grab the goodies from a position of power second, and force the losers to accept their loss third.

Reagan''s policies were not much different than that of the New York mafia, actually. No wonder Vince found himself being drawn to the 1980 election current in the time taking place in the book.

Vince, or Marty Hagen, his real name, had learned that due to his snitching on certain mafia figures in New York City, which had earned him a new life in Spokane, Washington as a baker of donuts from his being accepted into the federal Witness Relocation Program, he had been restored to his rights as a citizen of America, including the power of choosing what direction he felt should be taken in the election. Unfortunately, Vince had already fallen back into repeating his own past, and he is once again gambling, stealing credit card numbers in order to sell them to other criminals, and otherwise flirting with crime. He had no idea if he was going to vote, much less any idea of who he would support, but he couldn''t stop watching the race between Carter and Reagan. He still is stunned that he will be able to vote at all.

Ray Sticks, a mafia man who has no conscience and loves to torture and kill, has arrived in Spokane from New York City. He is a man on a mission, and it seems to be about Vince. Ray quickly discovers how Vince is stealing credit card numbers and he makes plans to infiltrate Vince''s racket. Ray may have other plans for Vince as well, since Ray''s occupation in New York was that of murdering people, especially women and children that other mafia killers refused to do.

Vince, having had the choice, framing it perhaps clumsily in the symbolism of his straight non-criminal life, of the solid nutrition of the baked and completed donut itself or the emptiness of the hole, has unfortunately put himself in the hole. Has he thrown away his ability to choose the direction of his life before he even grasped the opportunity? Worse, he might be destroying the lives of people, weaker than himself, who now depend on his choices. He has become involved with a prostitute, Beth, who is actually working at changing her life with far less resources than Vince. She is taking classes at the local community college to get her real estate license. She has almost nothing supporting her in this effort, but still she is trying. She also is hopeful that Vince will like her enough to become her boyfriend, but he only has eyes for a far more flashier, educated woman, Kelly, who is working on the campaign of a local politician running for a legislative seat. However, Kelly is lacking a solid foundation of values, as she is pursuing a relationship with a married man. Vince is drawn to choices of empty vacuity over those choices which could lead to solid fulfillment again and again. He excuses himself by calling it fate when he thinks about it, having enjoyed reading books with what he assumed were certain and unalterable endings - until he learned that authors could imagine other endings.

But he''s working on it.

This is a fantastic literary read disguised as a crime novel. I highly recommend it to mystery readers with a taste for ''quality'' literature as well.
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T.Szy.
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
4.5 - Not Walter''s Best, But Very Good
Reviewed in the United States on July 21, 2012
This is my second time through Citizen Vince. I read it several years ago when Walter was first emerging on the American Literature scene. After reading the first printings of Financial Lives of the Poets, and most recently, Beautiful Ruins, I felt the urge to go back and... See more
This is my second time through Citizen Vince. I read it several years ago when Walter was first emerging on the American Literature scene. After reading the first printings of Financial Lives of the Poets, and most recently, Beautiful Ruins, I felt the urge to go back and spin through Citizen Vince again. It is a quick read, and engaging mob crime novel, and a book that includes the ever impressive Walter plot development and philosophical musings of characters. Had I reviewed is book when I first read it, I probably would have given it a ''5'' - after reading this recent release of Beautiful Ruins (his magnum opus to date), I am giving it a ''4.5''

The main character, Vince Camden, finds himself transplanted from New York to Spokane, WA as a former low level NY crook in the federal witness protection program. Old habits die hard, so once settled in Spokane as a newly trained baker through the community college program, Vince doubles as a donut maker by day and a credit card crook by night. Vince is an extremely likable guy - cool, smart, introspective, funny, and even sensitive. The way I describe it, it might not add up. But Walter makes it happen in a very realistic way.

The story of Vince''s new life gets compacted quickly as his Spokane based racket begins to go sideways, and a mobster from NY shows up on the scene threatening Vince''s livelihood and life. Walter weaves in a little bit of romance, lots of vivid and memorable characters, and impressive dry witted humor. There are points where you will laugh out loud. Jess also overlays the storyline with what is happening on the national scene at time time - the Iranian hostage crisis and the Carter/Reagan presidential election. You can make as much as you want from is parallel plot line, but for me the nation in a crisis and the need for strong, inspiring leader to restore things to a better place stood out. Vince faced his own "do the right thing" crossroad, and the book''s outcome is telling in that area. I think it all worked in an enjoyable, crafty way.

If you are uncomfortable with an F-bomb laden narrative, you might want to skip this one. This is a book about mobsters - it would be hard to have it any other way.

Great, great read. Jess Walter is the real deal.
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NikkiP
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Superlative Edgar Best Novel winner
Reviewed in the United States on March 8, 2013
Frequently, Edgar Best Novel winners are a bit more literary that the usual run of mysteries and thrillers. This doesn''t necessarily mean they''re better books in terms of writing or entertainment, but that they examine a deeper issue than "whodunit" or "will the... See more
Frequently, Edgar Best Novel winners are a bit more literary that the usual run of mysteries and thrillers. This doesn''t necessarily mean they''re better books in terms of writing or entertainment, but that they examine a deeper issue than "whodunit" or "will the good guy escape the bad guy." Such a book is Citizen Vince.

When this book came into the house, my husband read it first. He warned me not to read the jacket copy before beginning it, just to plunge into the story, which was good advice. Therefore, I won''t talk about the plot. Citizen Vince takes place mostly in Spokane, Washington in the fall of 1980. There are plenty of suspenseful moments and snappy dialogues, but the book also delves into questions of identity, both external and internal, in the main plot and the subplot. It''s also quite well-written and for both the locations used, there''s a strong sense of place. It''s the character studies, though, that really make this such a good book. Even though there are eleven months left in the year, I''m sure this will be on my Ten Best list for 2013. Very highly recommended.
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Just Say Maybe
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not Sure How Author Pulled This Off
Reviewed in the United States on June 11, 2013
I have absolutely nothing in common with the protagonist, Vince Camden, but by the end of the novel I was living his life. Jess Walters has developed a very unique character. Ninety percent of the novel was told from this petty thief, crook and fringe mobster''s point of... See more
I have absolutely nothing in common with the protagonist, Vince Camden, but by the end of the novel I was living his life. Jess Walters has developed a very unique character. Ninety percent of the novel was told from this petty thief, crook and fringe mobster''s point of view. As the story developed I couldn''t put the book down. The other ten percent of the story was told from a Spokane detective''s, Jimmy Carter''s and Ronald Reagan''s point of view. The Carter and Reagan parts were poorly written, in fact...boring, a gimmick that didn''t work in my opinion and the main reason I gave this novel four stars instead of five. This is the third of Jess Walter''s books I''ve read (The Financial Lives of the Poets, Beautiful Ruins) and I will continue to read his books because I like his clever and realistic dialogue and his unique perspectives on the mundane aspects of our lives. I''m not sure how the author pulled it off, but by the end of the book I totally identified with this likable bad guy, and was emotionally touched by his poignant small victory.
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John Blumenthal
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not bad, but doesn''t come close to "Beautiful Ruins"
Reviewed in the United States on May 6, 2014
In my opinion, "Beautiful Ruins" is Jess Walters'' best novel. I had read "Financial Lives of Poets" first on the advice of friends and found it underwhelming. But "BR" was so good, I decided to read more of the author''s work. "Citizen Vince"... See more
In my opinion, "Beautiful Ruins" is Jess Walters'' best novel. I had read "Financial Lives of Poets" first on the advice of friends and found it underwhelming. But "BR" was so good, I decided to read more of the author''s work. "Citizen Vince" is good, but does not come close to "BR" in style and plot among other things, and is so different, it almost seems as if another writer wrote it. Most of Walter''s other novels appear to involve crime (I could be wrong -- I merely read samples) but that is not a subject matter that I am especially interested in. Granted, "Citizen Vince" is superior to many books in the genre but it did not come close to "BR". Will I read another Walters'' novel? I''m not sure.
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Tom Sahlberg
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A unique story, expertly told!
Reviewed in the United States on October 27, 2020
From a fellow Spokane native, who has enjoyed Jess''s writing for many years - I could not put this book down. The plot & character development were fascinating; the 1980 historical accuracy was spot on & best of all, as retired LE - my old "beats" were so colorfully... See more
From a fellow Spokane native, who has enjoyed Jess''s writing for many years - I could not put this book down. The plot & character development were fascinating; the 1980 historical accuracy was spot on & best of all, as retired LE - my old "beats" were so colorfully described. The language is rough, but true to the characters & times.
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Top reviews from other countries

BeeTee St Albans
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Citizen Vince
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 29, 2010
I first heard about citizen Vice in Nick Hornby''s book Polysallabric Spree. In which he reviews all the books he has read in a year. I had never heard ofthe author, Jess Walter befor, But Horby praised the book highly. I thoughly enjoyed it. The main caracter & story grab...See more
I first heard about citizen Vice in Nick Hornby''s book Polysallabric Spree. In which he reviews all the books he has read in a year. I had never heard ofthe author, Jess Walter befor, But Horby praised the book highly. I thoughly enjoyed it. The main caracter & story grab you from the first page. Vince is in the witness protection program. And his past threatens to catch up with him. Its a great story. Great characters. A love intrest. Plenty of violence. Thoughly Reccommended.
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SEO313
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I persisted and was glad I did
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 16, 2014
I started reading this book and after the first dozen pages believed it was not for me. However, I persisted and was glad I did.Vince, a former mobster, became with each page a more and more likeable character. By the end, I sincerely wished him well. There are plenty of...See more
I started reading this book and after the first dozen pages believed it was not for me. However, I persisted and was glad I did.Vince, a former mobster, became with each page a more and more likeable character. By the end, I sincerely wished him well. There are plenty of plot twists along the way to make it an engaging read.
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K Cliffe
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Four Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 2, 2015
Recommended by Nick hornby and also got my approval!
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Norman silverberg
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The good badguy, with philosophy
Reviewed in Canada on November 6, 2016
The good badguy, with philosophy....quiet terror and nice plot...Kept my interest for a day and much of the night until I finished. Satisfying read.
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Citizen Vince: outlet online sale A wholesale Novel outlet online sale

Citizen Vince: outlet online sale A wholesale Novel outlet online sale

Citizen Vince: outlet online sale A wholesale Novel outlet online sale

Citizen Vince: outlet online sale A wholesale Novel outlet online sale

Citizen Vince: outlet online sale A wholesale Novel outlet online sale

Citizen Vince: outlet online sale A wholesale Novel outlet online sale

Citizen Vince: outlet online sale A wholesale Novel outlet online sale

Citizen Vince: outlet online sale A wholesale Novel outlet online sale

Citizen Vince: outlet online sale A wholesale Novel outlet online sale

Citizen Vince: outlet online sale A wholesale Novel outlet online sale

Citizen Vince: outlet online sale A wholesale Novel outlet online sale

Citizen Vince: outlet online sale A wholesale Novel outlet online sale

Citizen Vince: outlet online sale A wholesale Novel outlet online sale