The Black Atlantic: wholesale Modernity and outlet sale Double-Consciousness outlet sale

The Black Atlantic: wholesale Modernity and outlet sale Double-Consciousness outlet sale

The Black Atlantic: wholesale Modernity and outlet sale Double-Consciousness outlet sale
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Afrocentrism. Eurocentrism. Caribbean Studies. British Studies. To the forces of cultural nationalism hunkered down in their camps, this bold hook sounds a liberating call. There is, Paul Gilroy tells us, a culture that is not specifically African, American, Caribbean, or British, but all of these at once, a black Atlantic culture whose themes and techniques transcend ethnicity and nationality to produce something new and, until now, unremarked. Challenging the practices and assumptions of cultural studies, The Black Atlantic also complicates and enriches our understanding of modernism.

Debates about postmodernism have cast an unfashionable pall over questions of historical periodization. Gilroy bucks this trend by arguing that the development of black culture in the Americas arid Europe is a historical experience which can be called modern for a number of clear and specific reasons. For Hegel, the dialectic of master and slave was integral to modernity, and Gilroy considers the implications of this idea for a transatlantic culture. In search of a poetics reflecting the politics and history of this culture, he takes us on a transatlantic tour of the music that, for centuries, has transmitted racial messages and feeling around the world, from the Jubilee Singers in the nineteenth century to Jimi Hendrix to rap. He also explores this internationalism as it is manifested in black writing from the “double consciousness” of W. E. B. Du Bois to the “double vision” of Richard Wright to the compelling voice of Toni Morrison.

In a final tour de force, Gilroy exposes the shared contours of black and Jewish concepts of diaspora in order both to establish a theoretical basis for healing rifts between blacks and Jews in contemporary culture and to further define the central theme of his book: that blacks have shaped a nationalism, if not a nation, within the shared culture of the black Atlantic.

Review

The Black Atlantic uses the transnational concept of the diaspora to explore the migrations, discontinuities, fractal patterns of exchange and hybrid glory that join the black cultures of America, Britain, and the Caribbean to one another and to Africa. Gilroy isn’t the first to chart the Black Atlantic, but he is the first to situate it… It is a bold and brilliant rethinking of the political geography of race.” Eric Lott , The Nation

“Against the grain of much contemporary thought that embraces ethnocentrism, Paul Gilroy has issued a stirring challenge to recognize the modern world as a cultural hybrid. The Black Atlantic is a wonderful chapter in the global intellectual history of the next century… Drawing on work in many disciplines, Gilroy provides a vivid alternative to competing positions in the current culture wars. He briefly outlines an intellectual rapprochement between Zionism and black nationalism, for example, and some of his most polemical remarks are reserved for those Afrocentrists who proclaim a linear inheritance from Africa but wish to ignore the intervening cultural hybridization produced by slavery… Present anxiety about the supposed disuniting and fraying of America’s national culture, or about its forced concentration into an assimilating mold, might be significantly allayed if readers would pay serious attention to the invigorating claims of The Black Atlantic.” Eric J. Sundquist , Newsday

“Building on W. E. B. Du Bois’s early 20th-century theories of race and double-consciousness and taking Du Bois’s own transatlantic career as a paradigmatic instance of the modernism of black experiences of diaspora, Gilroy accomplishes an exciting recharting of the complexities of black thought in the West… [The] book has the additional merit of providing remarkable rereadings of Du Bois, Richard Wright, Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass and others.” Aldon L. Nielsen , Washington Post Book World

“Spike Lee and Jazzie B., Walter Benjamin and the Jubilee Singers, Sonia Boyce and Keith Piper, Richard Wright, Theodor Adorno, J. M. W. Turner and W. E. B. Du Bois, Hegel, Hendrix, and 2 Live Crew: Very few writers could find things to say about every character on so dazzlingly eclectic a cast-list. Perhaps only Paul Gilroy could offer not merely striking insights about all of them, but present a compelling case for their belonging in the same narrative… Gilroy’s lucidity is exemplary.” Stephen Howe , New Statesman & Society

“His most influential work, use[s] the writings of enslaved people and their descendants to demonstrate their centrality to the making of the modern world…In this moment of resurgent anti-racist politics, people are turning to Gilroy’s work…[His] reputation in the field is unrivalled.” Yohann Koshy , The Guardian

“A thoughtful evaluation of Western black identity, and a scathing critique of the nationalist, ‘ethical absolutist’ position that posits that such identities are mutually exclusive… There is much to recommend about [it]: many thought-provoking questions and compelling arguments.” Carrie B. Robinson , Quarterly Black Review of Books

“This book’s many virtues of style combine with elegant local readings of Douglass, Wright, Du Bois, Morrison; of Adorno and Baumann; and a whole range of popular culture from jazz to Hip Hop… It is a mark of the ambition and the achievement of this book that so many readers will find it rewarding.” Kwame Anthony Appiah, Harvard University

“This is a splendid book… Gilroy’s main contribution to scholarship is that by inserting black people as central participants in the creation of the modern world he thereby rewrites the history of modernity and modernism.” Hazel Carby, Yale University

From the Back Cover

There is, Paul Gilroy tells us, a culture that is not specifically African, American, Caribbean, or British, but all of these at once, a black Atlantic culture whose themes and techniques transcend ethnicity and nationality to produce something new and, until now, unremarked. Challenging the practices and assumptions of cultural studies, Gilroy complicates and enriches our understanding of modernism. He also exposes the shared contours of Black and Jewish concepts of diaspora to establish a theoretical basis for healing rifts between blacks and Jews in contemporary culture.

About the Author

Paul Gilroy holds the Anthony Giddens Professorship in Social Theory at the London School of Economics.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
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Case Quarter
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
is the medium the message?
Reviewed in the United States on January 16, 2012
gilroy writes of forms of transmission, historically describing communication of experience and culture by blacks from periods of history when direct communication was regimented, curtailed and silenced up to the post-literate musical culture of the twentieth century.... See more
gilroy writes of forms of transmission, historically describing communication of experience and culture by blacks from periods of history when direct communication was regimented, curtailed and silenced up to the post-literate musical culture of the twentieth century.

during slavery, ways of communication were found in song and dance, in utterance and gesture. in the case of margaret garner, an escaped slave on trail for killing her child, the violence of slavery and its effects were made known in several forms: the act of infancide, the publication of the act through the media, personal published accounts such as in a memoir by an abolitionist, levi coffin, the championing of the case by a noted suffragist of the day, lucy stoner, and, a century later, continued by the fictionalization of margaret garner''s story by toni morrison in her novel, Beloved.

gilroy looks at two forms of transmission, sea travel and the artifact: books, records, and choirs. situating his book in the countries on the continents connected by the atlantic ocean, africa, europe and the north and south americas, he touches on communication on slave ships from africa, with deeper probing into communication by 19th century free black intellectuals, those fortunate to travel to other countries, and communication by blacks during the slave trade, free and enslaved, who worked on ships. for gilroy, the travels resulted in interaction, and the exchange and transmission of ideas.

delving into the double consciousness blacks experienced living in two cultures, gilroy argues that blacks were no strangers to modernity in europe and the americas, that modernity was not exclusive to whites, and that europe and the americas benefited from the contributions of blacks, slave, traveler, and citizen alike.

the writers, frederick douglass and richard wright, and their books, are given chapters, as is the fisk choir, and, more recently, the record in the hands of producers and performers of the hip hop generations.

although gilroy has included some interesting stories of black intellectuals that should appeal to the general reader, a word to the wise, The Black Atlantic is work by a serious scholar, highly researched, and part of an informed conversation among black intellectuals.
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C. B. Eaton
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Exploring New Perspectives
Reviewed in the United States on October 20, 2016
An important book for anyone who enjoys black history and social constructs. Used in a class in Graduate School and Gilroy is very eloquent but a boatload of difficult words even for Master level students so have a dictionary at hand....
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Gregory M. Carter
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This book turns historical methodology upside down and introduces transnational ...
Reviewed in the United States on February 14, 2017
This book turns historical methodology upside down and introduces transnational methodology, among other things. A must-read for all new historians learning methodology.
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Ulrich Gdhler
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A New Continent “in between”
Reviewed in the United States on August 6, 2014
The turn from class politics to identity politics and from „Western Marxism” to post-Structuralist deconstruction in the 1980s appeared to me as a de-politicization of the intellectual discourse and probably also as an effect of the historical defeat of the Left against... See more
The turn from class politics to identity politics and from „Western Marxism” to post-Structuralist deconstruction in the 1980s appeared to me as a de-politicization of the intellectual discourse and probably also as an effect of the historical defeat of the Left against Neoliberal “There is no Alternative” ideology. Of course there were the exceptional works of Judith Butler, which demonstrated the powder keg implied in deconstruction. But as Literature Theory and Cultural Studies are concerned I saw (and still do) their development from the 1970s to the 1990s rather as a descent into academic institutionalisation and political irrelevance.
Peter Gilroy’s “The Black Atlantic” is one of the books that could perhaps change my mind. Coming from a family of Caribbean immigrants to London, Gilroy is both European and black, a black Englishman. Being a black Englishman is in fact a provocation against modern racism per se. While racist and nationalist discourses describe those identities as mutually exclusive, Gilroy is interested in ambiguities and the space between them and finds a whole new world. Gilroy very much builds on W.E.B. Du Bois’ book “The Souls of Black Folk” (1903) and the theory of a “double consciousness”.
Gilroy settles on the image of ships in motion and across the Atlantic, the “Black Atlantic”. Gilroy discovers a new continent “in between”. This is the world of Oluadah Equiano and the black Chartists Cuffay and Wedderburn. Did you know that at the end of the eighteenth century a quarter of the British navy was composed of Africans? Gilroy wants to overcome nationalist approaches and argues cultural historians could take the Atlantic as one single unit of analysis and produce an explicitly transnational and intercultural perspective. The book “The Black Atlantic” deals with the journeys of W.E.B. DuBois and Richard Wright. Gilroy explains that contact with Europe were seminal for both authors. Gilroy uses the concept of “Diaspora” instead of the pan-African discourse.
Gilroy was a scholar at the famous Birmingham Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies. He asks critical questions about the association of Cultural Studies with “Englishness” in the works of Raymond Williams and E.P. Thompson. He strongly advocates breaking away from the idea of a left English nationalism. Gilroy wants to break the dogmatic focus on discrete national dynamics and sharply criticizes the “morbid celebration of England and Englishness” in the works of Raymond Williams. Gilroy deals with the painting “The Slave Ship” by J.M.W. Turner and its owner John Ruskin. He demonstrates the complicity of Williams’ national canon of conservative anti-industrialists with slavery. This is a sharp critique of Williams’ famous book “Culture and Society”.
Gilroy likes to talk of the Jamaica migrants in Britain as “black settlers” and uses a notion usually reserved for white English colonists in America for black immigrants in England. He is interested in the hybridity and intermixture of ideas. He shows the important role black slaves played in the development of the English labour movement and the important role of Hegelian philosophy in the work of W.E.D. DuBois.
Gilroy discovers a complicity of racialized reason and white supremacist terror. He mentions the racist prejudices of Kant, Voltaire, and Burke. In Gilroy’s account black vernacular culture has become a sort of post-modernism “avant la lettre”.
Gilroy develops his arguments with black music as the expression of the unspeakable terrors of slavery. The main chapters of the book deal with W.E.B Du Bois’ and Richard Wright’s journeys to Bismarck’s Germany and France. I believe it would make sense to read at least Du Bois’ “The Soul of Black Folks” and Richard Wright’s “Native Son” before tackling “The Black Atlantic”. Anyway, after reading “The Black Atlantic” I have to change my reading lists.
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HNR
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Excellent seller
Reviewed in the United States on July 24, 2018
As described and shipped rapidly.
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Umar
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Five Stars
Reviewed in the United States on June 20, 2015
As advertised.
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martin de leon
5.0 out of 5 stars
a textual odyssey of rethinking black political culture.
Reviewed in the United States on September 2, 2001
In "The Black Atlantic" Paul Gilroy constructs an excellent text based on the black diasporic experience. His views of black culture as being a dynamic networked construct based on the idea of the diaspora derived from Jewish culture, is an illuminating concept... See more
In "The Black Atlantic" Paul Gilroy constructs an excellent text based on the black diasporic experience. His views of black culture as being a dynamic networked construct based on the idea of the diaspora derived from Jewish culture, is an illuminating concept that contains great substance. Gilroy''s underlying transnational humanism (that can be read in his latest pseudo-utopian work "Against Race") and vital rethinking about the perils of cultural nationalism and the urgent benefits of a unique hybrid culture is a thoroughly needed breath in the stasis of linear monocultural thinking. The book functions in an excellent manner in addressing the complex dynamics of slavery, colonization, and their inherent residual effects on black political culture. In addition the method in which Gilroy weaves Adorno, Hendrix, hip-hop culture, Du Bois, Wright, Hegel and a host of others in a clear and eloquent manner is cause for reading in itself. In a nutshell, this is a valuable sociological and philosophical work that creates a rupture in linear, absolutist views of history, sexuality, identity and other various elements in relation to black particularity. In this book Gilroy composes the dynamics of intercultural exchange (whether artistic, political, social, moral etc.) as well as attributing to socialized historical memory through its brilliant text.
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JohnnnySmallls
4.0 out of 5 stars
Great Ideas About the Ideas of the Atlantic
Reviewed in the United States on May 30, 2011
This is one of the most interesting and thought-provoking reads a person could ask for. It explains how difficult a double consciousness is to live with, break, and evolve from. This says more about the development of the Atlantic World than just about anything ever written.
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academic art historian
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
poor quality subsitute
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 23, 2021
The book that arrived was an inexpensive "printed by Amazon" copy and not an edition produced by the actual publisher. Dissatisfied and returning it. Buyers ought to be told if it isn''t the edition that matches the description.
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sherin
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One Star
Reviewed in India on April 24, 2018
The book was not an original copy. It was a pirated copy
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Beverley B
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Classic
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 20, 2018
Has become a Classic text. Even when you don’t agree theoretically if you writing about the black British experience you’ve got to read Gilroy
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RB
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Four Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 1, 2018
Very good
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carlos sampson
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Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 27, 2015
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The Black Atlantic: wholesale Modernity and outlet sale Double-Consciousness outlet sale

The Black Atlantic: wholesale Modernity and outlet sale Double-Consciousness outlet sale

The Black Atlantic: wholesale Modernity and outlet sale Double-Consciousness outlet sale

The Black Atlantic: wholesale Modernity and outlet sale Double-Consciousness outlet sale

The Black Atlantic: wholesale Modernity and outlet sale Double-Consciousness outlet sale

The Black Atlantic: wholesale Modernity and outlet sale Double-Consciousness outlet sale

The Black Atlantic: wholesale Modernity and outlet sale Double-Consciousness outlet sale

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