The Book of Two Ways: outlet sale new arrival A Novel online

The Book of Two Ways: outlet sale new arrival A Novel online

The Book of Two Ways: outlet sale new arrival A Novel online

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Product Description

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • From the author of Small Great Things and A Spark of Light comes a “powerful” (The Washington Post) novel about the choices that alter the course of our lives.

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY MARIE CLAIRE

Everything changes in a single moment for Dawn Edelstein. She’s on a plane when the flight attendant makes an announcement: Prepare for a crash landing. She braces herself as thoughts flash through her mind. The shocking thing is, the thoughts are not of her husband but of a man she last saw fifteen years ago: Wyatt Armstrong.

Dawn, miraculously, survives the crash, but so do all the doubts that have suddenly been raised. She has led a good life. Back in Boston, there is her husband, Brian, their beloved daughter, and her work as a death doula, in which she helps ease the transition between life and death for her clients.

But somewhere in Egypt is Wyatt Armstrong, who works as an archaeologist unearthing ancient burial sites, a career Dawn once studied for but was forced to abandon when life suddenly intervened. And now, when it seems that fate is offering her second chances, she is not as sure of the choice she once made.

After the crash landing, the airline ensures that the survivors are seen by a doctor, then offers transportation to wherever they want to go. The obvious destination is to fly home, but she could take another path: return to the archaeological site she left years before, reconnect with Wyatt and their unresolved history, and maybe even complete her research on The Book of Two Ways—the first known map of the afterlife.

As the story unfolds, Dawn’s two possible futures unspool side by side, as do the secrets and doubts long buried with them. Dawn must confront the questions she’s never truly asked: What does a life well lived look like? When we leave this earth, what do we leave behind? Do we make choices . . . or do our choices make us? And who would you be if you hadn’t turned out to be the person you are right now?

Amazon.com Review

How many of us have looked back on a decision that changed our lives and wondered: what if we had made a different choice? Picoult’s novel The Book of Two Ways digs into this very question and the result is incredibly thought-provoking. Dawn Edelstein was once a young grad student working on a dig in Egypt, in love with a fellow Egyptologist, and getting ever closer to proving a radical new theory about ancient Egyptians’ burial rituals for the road to the afterlife. Then a phone call from home changed everything. Fifteen years later, Dawn is married, with a teenage daughter, and working in Boston as a death doula, helping the dying prepare to leave this world in the best way possible. When Dawn has a near-death experience she is confronted with the question of whether the good life she has could have been a great one. Dawn doesn’t just ponder the question—she returns to Egypt, and the man she once loved, to see if she can find the answer. Picoult incorporates fascinating details about Egyptology into her novel—the title comes from an ancient Egyptian tome of the same name—bringing history and a universal connection into the story. The Book of Two Ways is a provocative exploration into monumental questions: about the life we are living, who we want to be with when we die, and whether it’s possible—and acceptable—to change our mind, return to the trailhead, and go another way. —Seira Wilson, Amazon Book Review
Editors'' pick: Picoult asks big questions about living, dying, and whether it’s possible—and acceptable—to change one’s mind and go another way."—Seira Wilson, Amazon Editor

Review

“A thrilling adventure . . . With Picoult’s stories, there is always something new to learn, and The Book of Two Ways is no exception. . . . A fun and interesting read, one that will lead readers to both learn a lot and also ask themselves key questions about how to create happy lives for themselves during the short time we have on earth.” —Associated Press
 
The Book of Two Ways is a return for Picoult to the themes of her earliest books—motherhood, complicated romantic love. . . . Picoult, at this point in her career, could skillfully build tension in a broom closet, but the best part of this book is not the suspense; it’s the look at the complexity of a woman as she enters middle age. . . . Picoult always tells both sides of a story not with judgment, but with grace.” The Washington Post
 
“Jodi Picoult fans rejoice! . . . The Book of Two Ways is one story you won’t be able to put down.” —CNN
 
“Asking life or death questions in perfect Picoult fashion.” Parade
 
“[A] delightfully escapist, high-concept novel . . . The Book of Two Ways nearly spills over in its earnestness and emotion. . . . This is a book of big, burning questions such as what defines a great life.” —BookTrib

“Picoult’s fans will appreciate this multifaceted, high-concept work.” Publishers Weekly
 
“Picoult’s fans will be more than ready for this puzzle of a novel. . . . [They] will find heady themes to consider.” Booklist
 
“Jodi Picoult knows how to write allll the feels, and The Book of Two Ways is no exception.” Cosmopolitan
 
“Unputdownable.”— E! Online
 
“Riveting.” —Womendotcom
 
“If you didn’t already see Jodi’s name and preorder this one, let us convince you.”— Good Housekeeping

About the Author

Jodi Picoult is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of twenty-four novels, including A Spark of Light, Small Great Things, Leaving Time, The Storyteller, Lone Wolf, Sing You Home, House Rules, Handle with Care, Change of Heart, Nineteen Minutes, and My Sister’s Keeper. She is also the author, with daughter Samantha van Leer, of two young adult novels, Between the Lines and Off the Page. Picoult lives in New Hampshire.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Prologue

My calendar is full of dead people. 

When my phone alarm chimes, I fish it out from the pocket of my cargo pants. I’ve forgotten, with the time change, to turn off the reminder. I’m still groggy with sleep, but I open the date and read the names: Iris Vale. Eun Ae Kim. Alan Rosenfeldt. Marlon Jensen

I close my eyes, and do what I do every day at this moment: I remember them. 

Iris, who had died tiny and birdlike, had once driven a getaway car for a man she loved who’d robbed a bank. Eun Ae, who had been a doctor in Korea, but couldn’t practice in the United States. Alan had proudly showed me the urn he bought for his cremated remains and then joked, I haven’t tried it on yet. Marlon had changed out all the toilets in his house and put in new flooring and cleaned the gutters; he bought graduation gifts for his two children and hid them away. He took his twelve-year-old daughter to a hotel ballroom and waltzed with her while I filmed it on his phone, so that the day she got married there would be video of her dancing with her father. 

At one point, they were my clients. Now, they’re my stories to keep. 

Everyone in my row is asleep. I slip my phone back into my pocket and carefully crawl over the woman to my right without disturbing her—air traveler’s yoga—to make my way to the bathroom in the rear of the plane. There I blow my nose and look in the mirror. I’m at the age where that’s a surprise, where I still think I’m going to see a younger woman rather than the one who blinks back at me. Lines fan from the corners of my eyes, like the creases of a familiar map. If I untangle the braid that lies over my left shoulder, these terrible fluorescent lights would pick up those first gray strands in my hair. I’m wearing baggy pants with an elastic waist, like every other sensible nearly-forty woman who knows she’s going to be on a plane for a long-haul flight. I grab a handful of tissues and open the door, intent on heading back to my seat, but the little galley area is packed with flight attendants. They are knotted together like a frown. 

They stop talking when I appear. “Ma’am,” one of them says, “could you please take your seat?” 

It strikes me that their job isn’t really very different from mine. If you’re on a plane, you’re not where you started, and you’re not where you’re going. You’re caught in between. A flight attendant is the guide who helps you navigate that passage smoothly. As a death doula, I do the same thing, but the journey is from life to death, and at the end, you don’t disembark with two hundred other travelers. You go alone. 

I climb back over the sleeping woman in the aisle seat and buckle my seatbelt just as the overhead lights blaze and the cabin comes alive. 

“Ladies and gentlemen,” a voice announces, “we have just been informed by the captain that we’re going to have a planned emergency. Please listen to the flight attendants and follow their directions.” 

I am frozen. Planned emergency. The oxymoron sticks in my mind. 

There is a quick rush of sound—shock rolls through the cabin—but no screams, no loud cries. Even the baby behind me, who shrieked for the first two hours of the flight, is silent. “We’re crashing,” the woman on the aisle whispers. “Oh my God, we’re crashing.”

She must be wrong; there hasn’t even been turbulence. Everything has been normal. But then the flight attendants station themselves in the aisles, performing a strange, staccato ballet of safety movements as instructions are read over the speakers. Fasten your seatbelts. When you hear the word brace, assume the brace position. After the plane comes to a complete stop you’ll hear Release your seatbelts. Get out. Leave everything behind.

Leave everything behind. 

For someone who makes a living through death, I haven’t given a lot of thought to my own. 

I have heard that when you are about to die, your life flashes before your eyes. 

But I do not picture my husband, Brian, his sweater streaked with inevitable chalk dust from the old-school blackboards in his physics lab. Or Meret, as a little girl, asking me to check for monsters under the bed. I do not envision my mother, not like she was at the end or before that, when Kieran and I were young. 

Instead, I see him. 

As clearly as if it were yesterday, I imagine Wyatt in the middle of the Egyptian desert, the sun beating down on his hat, his neck ringed with dirt from the constant wind, his teeth a flash of lightning. A man who hasn’t been part of my life for fifteen years. A place I left behind. 

A dissertation I never finished. 

Ancient Egyptians believed that to get to the afterlife, they had to be deemed innocent in the Judgment Hall. Their hearts were weighed against the feather of Ma’at, of truth. 

I am not so sure my heart will pass. 

The woman to my right is softly praying in Spanish. I fumble for my phone, thinking to turn it on, to send a message, even though I know there is no signal, but I can’t seem to open the button on my pants pocket. A hand catches mine and squeezes.

I look down at our fists, squeezed so tight a secret couldn’t slip between our palms.

Brace, the flight attendants yell. Brace! 

As we fall out of the sky, I wonder who will remember me.


Much later I would learn that when a plane crashes and the emergency personnel show up, the flight attendants tell them how many souls were on board. Souls, not people. As if they know our bodies are only passing through for a little while. 

I would learn that one of the fuel filters became clogged midflight. That the second filter-clogging light came on in the cockpit forty-five minutes out, and in spite of what the pilots tried, they could not clear it, and they realized they’d have to do a land evacuation. I would learn that the plane came in short of Raleigh-Durham, sticking down in the football field of a private school. As it hit the bleachers with a wing, the plane tipped, rolled, broke into pieces. 

Much later I would learn of the family with the baby behind me, whose row of three seats separated from the floor and was thrown free from the aircraft, killing them instantaneously. I would hear about the six others who had been crushed as the metal buckled; the flight attendant who never came out of her coma. I would read the names of the passengers in the last ten rows who hadn’t gotten out of the broken fuselage before it erupted in flame. 

I would learn that I was one of thirty-six people who walked away from the crash. 

When I step out of the examination room of the hospital we’ve been taken to, I’m dazed. A woman in a uniform is in the hallway, talking to a man with a bandaged arm. She is part of an emergency response team from the airline that has overseen medical checks by physicians, given us clean clothes and food, and flown in frantic family members. 

“Ms. Edelstein?” she says, and I blink, until I realize she is talking to me. 

A million years ago, I had been Dawn McDowell. I’d published under that name. But my passport and license read Edelstein. Like Brian’s. 

In her hand she has a checklist of crash survivors. 

She puts a tick next to my name. “Have you been seen by a doctor?” 

“Not yet.” I glance back at the examination room. 

“Okay. I’m sure you have some questions . . . ?” 

That’s an understatement. 

Why am I alive, when others aren’t?


Why did I book this particular flight?

What if I’d been detained checking in, and had missed it?

What if I’d made any of a thousand other choices that would have led me far away from this crash?

At that, I think of Brian, and his theory of the multiverse. Somewhere, in a parallel timeline, there is another me at my own funeral.

At the same time, I think—again, always—of Wyatt.

I have to get out of here.

I don’t realize I have said this out loud until the airline representative responds.

“Once we get the doctor’s paperwork, you’re clear to leave. Is someone coming for you, or do you need us to make travel arrangements?”

We, the lucky ones, have been told we can have a plane ticket anywhere we need to go—to our destination, back to where the flight originated, even somewhere else, if necessary. I have already called my husband. Brian offered to come get me, but I told him not to. I didn’t say why.

I clear my throat. “I have to book a flight,” I say.

“Absolutely.” The woman nods. “Where do you need to go?”

Boston, I think. Home. But there’s something about the way she phrases the question: need, instead of want; and another destination rises like steam in my mind.

I open my mouth, and I answer.

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4.1 out of 54.1 out of 5
13,436 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Dee
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Deleted after two chapters
Reviewed in the United States on September 24, 2020
I did not like this book at all. It made my brain hurt. I deleted it after two chapters. If I wanted to take a class on Egyptology, I would take one. I read mostly for pleasure. Terribly disappointed. I was not a big fan of the last book either but at least there were parts... See more
I did not like this book at all. It made my brain hurt. I deleted it after two chapters. If I wanted to take a class on Egyptology, I would take one. I read mostly for pleasure. Terribly disappointed. I was not a big fan of the last book either but at least there were parts that I liked and I did end up enjoying it at times. This one not at all. She was once my favorite author. She''s dropping fast. Very disappointed. I wish I could get my money back. Jodi, please go back to your old style of writing. You were the best of the best.
369 people found this helpful
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Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
No Two Ways About It: Brilliant
Reviewed in the United States on September 23, 2020
To have a book dropped wordlessly in the night into your Kindle in a night you are climbing out of recovery for Stage 4 cancer treatment, and to have the book be this one, this spiritual agnostic acknowledges, again, that there are forces in our world at work that we cannot... See more
To have a book dropped wordlessly in the night into your Kindle in a night you are climbing out of recovery for Stage 4 cancer treatment, and to have the book be this one, this spiritual agnostic acknowledges, again, that there are forces in our world at work that we cannot explain.

To say I couldn''t put this down is clichéd, and I did. I had to sleep. But I didn''t stop thinking. I have never ran a complete parallel conversation in my brain as I did with this one. I will need to re-read to capture all the Egyptolog details, and confirm what time spinning I believe took place. I can''t imagine the brilliance of how to weave quantum physics, Egyptian pathways, and death doulas into a love story for a daughter, a mother, a brother, a lover and a husband - and maybe even a little growing love for self and all that is sacrificed in living life and all that we fear when faced with dying.

Thank you, Jodi. It''s the book I wanted to read before I died.
260 people found this helpful
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B. Brown
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Way over my head
Reviewed in the United States on September 23, 2020
I only got part way into this book - the writing was so intellectually over my pay grade. I have worked in the newspaper business my entire life so I am pretty good with words, etc. but when I have to look up every other word or have no idea for pages what I am reading,... See more
I only got part way into this book - the writing was so intellectually over my pay grade. I have worked in the newspaper business my entire life so I am pretty good with words, etc. but when I have to look up every other word or have no idea for pages what I am reading, then the book certainly doesn''t meet my criteria for entertaining. So far I haven''t found much of a story to the book. Maybe someday I will go back and try again. For now I put it down.
256 people found this helpful
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D. Burton
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Uggg. That ending. All that to get to that end?
Reviewed in the United States on September 25, 2020
The book had way too many Egyptian facts that were unnecessary to the story mired the story down. The formula of switching from past present to future flopped around switching timelines way too often and was more annoying than effective. And the main character was frankly... See more
The book had way too many Egyptian facts that were unnecessary to the story mired the story down. The formula of switching from past present to future flopped around switching timelines way too often and was more annoying than effective. And the main character was frankly unlikable I did not believe in her love in either relationship. She was smart but, weak. The husband was written so nobel he was unbelievable. And frankly his physics bits were just as boring as a the Egyptian facts... Just wasted time and words that didn''t add anything. And I hated the ending. It was a complete let down.
222 people found this helpful
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Claire S.
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Tedious
Reviewed in the United States on September 24, 2020
Too many lectures and too little plot. It was like swimming through peanut butter just to keep the story in mind.
193 people found this helpful
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Vickie Watts
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
More Like Non-Fiction with a Little Bit of Fiction in the Mix
Reviewed in the United States on September 22, 2020
Jodi Picoult’s newest book was really different from anything that I have read by her before. Instead of being a fiction book with a little bit of background history if needed, this one was more like a study of Egyptology with a story as the background. I was mired deeply... See more
Jodi Picoult’s newest book was really different from anything that I have read by her before. Instead of being a fiction book with a little bit of background history if needed, this one was more like a study of Egyptology with a story as the background. I was mired deeply into all of the facts about tombs, long names of Egyptian rulers and how to read hieroglyphics. And that wasn’t in a good way! Sometimes, I felt lost in the tombs of ancient Egypt and was ready for the story to move along. The plot was about Dawn, a death doula, and her relationship with her husband Brian and her former lover Wyatt. Most of the plot was entertaining, but again, the endless repetitive details! And the subconscious of Dawn when a plane crashes was also hard to follow what was happening. If you are a fan of Picoult, you may enjoy this book, but it wasn’t my favorite by a long shot. It seemed to be promoting her son’s interest in Egyptology instead of her readers’ interest in her usually fascinating stories. I did enjoy reading about Dawn’s occupation and how she helped people slip from life into death in the most comfortable way possible. This book is not exactly historical fiction, but it has a lot of history in it so I’m not sure how to classify it.
Disclaimer
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher via Netgalley. I was not required to write a positive review. I also purchased a copy of my own from Amazon. The opinions expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255, “Guides Concerning the Use of Testimonials and Endorsements in Advertising.”
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Diane
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Usually I love Jodi''s books. This one I struggled to finish.
Reviewed in the United States on September 26, 2020
Normally I would stay up half the night to finish a new Picoult book. Not this one! I finished it only because I had pre-ordered and paid for it. Every other chapter was a long, excruciatingly detailed narrative about ancient Egyptian history. Eventually, even the... See more
Normally I would stay up half the night to finish a new Picoult book. Not this one! I finished it only because I had pre-ordered and paid for it. Every other chapter was a long, excruciatingly detailed narrative about ancient Egyptian history. Eventually, even the current day Boston chapters devolved into thinking about ancient Egypt. ENOUGH!!! I read Jodi''s books for nuanced characters dealing with current social issues. This book does not fit that mold, and I didn''t enjoy it.
157 people found this helpful
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Darlene Mahla
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Jodi Picoult is one of my favorite authors.... BUT!
Reviewed in the United States on September 23, 2020
I have read every novel Jodi Picoult has ever written. I usually love her style, characters, etc. The Book of Two Ways, however, left me wanting. It read too much like a history book. There were pages and pages that I just skimmed through because there was simply too much... See more
I have read every novel Jodi Picoult has ever written. I usually love her style, characters, etc. The Book of Two Ways, however, left me wanting. It read too much like a history book. There were pages and pages that I just skimmed through because there was simply too much details about mummies, hieroglyphics in Egypt, tombs, excavation, death and so on. And, of course, throughout the entire book, you are waiting to find out who "Olive" will choose and, well I don''t want to spoil the ending if you haven''t read it yet... but, again, it left me wanting.
127 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

sue
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Boring and over priced.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 21, 2020
Really struggled with this so bored only got to chapter 2. Paid £9.99 on kindle. Very over priced. Looking forward to this too. Usually love her books. Too much detail about egypt, felt more like a history lesson than a novel. Not happy I wasted £10 to end up deleting after...See more
Really struggled with this so bored only got to chapter 2. Paid £9.99 on kindle. Very over priced. Looking forward to this too. Usually love her books. Too much detail about egypt, felt more like a history lesson than a novel. Not happy I wasted £10 to end up deleting after 2 chapters. Do amazon really need to charge so expensive for kindle downloads. I know it''s a new release but it''s not a hard copy. I wish I would have download a sample of book first, But I pre ordered it on the back of authors other amazing books. Her books are usually fantastic. But this one wasnt for me. Sorry jodi. X
45 people found this helpful
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Heather
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
So disappointed with this book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 7, 2020
A real letdown. I’m a huge fan of Jodi Picoult and I’ve read all her books until this one. I dislike the characters, the story is more an encyclopaedia of Egyptian history and quantum physics. If I want to study those subjects then I’ll enrol on a course, but I found that...See more
A real letdown. I’m a huge fan of Jodi Picoult and I’ve read all her books until this one. I dislike the characters, the story is more an encyclopaedia of Egyptian history and quantum physics. If I want to study those subjects then I’ll enrol on a course, but I found that by the time I’d trawled through the lectures I had lost total interest in what the story was about. There’s no question, Jodi definitely did her research. However, I stopped reading halfway through because I just thought ‘Life’s too short ‘! I will normally persevere with a book, especially when I spend £10 on it, but this time I’ve abandoned it. I was so disappointed as I’d been so looking forward to reading this book. Next time I will download a trial before I buy it.
34 people found this helpful
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Simon Hares SerialTrainer7 Ltd
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Prepare for a lesson in Egyptology...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 4, 2020
Having read everything Jodi Picoult has written, I was so excited when this arrived. I was actually even more excited when I saw that it contained elements of Egypt too. However. There are substantial sections of the long chapters that are taken up with information you...See more
Having read everything Jodi Picoult has written, I was so excited when this arrived. I was actually even more excited when I saw that it contained elements of Egypt too. However. There are substantial sections of the long chapters that are taken up with information you would learn on a course about Egyptology. Reading the authors notes it is clear that this book was written for her son, who has studied Egyptology in depth, so nice touch. The thing is I totally understand the need to show that you have done your research, but this element of the book comes across as too educational and moves away from the story. It can feel a bit lazy when an author does this too. "I have a story, it needs some meat on the bones, what can I do...ooh I know I will educate my readers with a history lesson and some cool pictures" It doesn''t work. The story in this book is actually fascinating, I really bought into the the two story lines, I liked the relationship that the man character has for the two men in her life, with the twists and turns that go with it. The overdoes of history just distracts too much. Dial it back a bit on the history and just give us the amazing stories covering the great subjects moving forward.
30 people found this helpful
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Rachel
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Disappointing
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 29, 2020
If I''d wanted too learn about Ancient Egypt, I would''ve read a book written by an expeert and not a Jodi Picoult novel. predictable. No proper ending. Definitely not worth the £9.99 I spent.
24 people found this helpful
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Emily
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
boring
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 29, 2020
I love Jodis books but I could not get into this one. I haven''t finished it yet but im not really bothered if I do. I don''t want to read about ancient Egypt by the blurb it was misleading I thought it was about her life as a death doula prominently.
19 people found this helpful
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The Book of Two Ways: outlet sale new arrival A Novel online

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The Book of Two Ways: outlet sale new arrival A Novel online

The Book of Two Ways: outlet sale new arrival A Novel online

The Book of Two Ways: outlet sale new arrival A Novel online

The Book of Two Ways: outlet sale new arrival A Novel online

The Book of Two Ways: outlet sale new arrival A Novel online